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The Avro Logo

The following article was created following much online “discussion” about whether the Blue or Red logo was correct. Our chief archivist George Jenks did some research and this is the outcome.

The origin of the triangle is the panel above A.V.Roe’s shed doors at Brooklands. However, when the question of the logo origin was raised in the Avro News in the early 1950s, it was answered by none other than Alliott Verdon-Roe himself who admitted that he was also influenced by his fondness of the triangular Cape of Good Hope postage stamps!

The plain black triangle did not last for long on early adverts and the winged triangle evolved.

During the First World War when the Company received large production contracts from the Government for Avro 504s a crown was added on top of the triangle. We have an example in the Museum.

Although the basic design of the logo was established at an early stage the question of colours most certainly was not! Note the ‘crowned’ version has a dark blue triangle. By early 1927 when the Avian went into production the triangle had been extended downwards to form a diamond in order to add the aeroplane type. Close inspection of photos suggests that this was hand-painted initially as the detail of the wings varies, but by the end of the year a stencil appears to have been made. The colour appears to be black or white depending on the fuselage colour.

By early 1928 a transfer had been created in gold with black lining with the word ‘AVRO’ picked out in red. We have an original example from the mid 30s in the Museum showing how the Type was added as a scroll underneath – in this case Type 626. This same transfer was used on Company Transport (house colour blue) on the cab doors with the scroll merely cut off. The writer has an original Motor Club Rally Control Board circa 1960 and you can clearly see where the scroll has been cut off on the triangle base.

When it comes to publicity material there appeared to be no hard and fast rules, and many variations have been used over the years. We are also aware of pre-war publicity material with a white triangle. When Avro Canada was formed, they adopted the Avro logo with ‘Canada’ underneath, later changing to Avro ‘Aircraft’ but in a single colour, usually blue or red.

NOTE: ‘AVRO AIRCRAFT’ was never used by the UK Company.